Progress – July 22, 2018

July 23, 2018

Pre-bike ride of 12 miles:

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I survived.

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At least I was good during the bike ride and recovered well enough to go walk another half mile at the gym and then went and walked around an “craft” show. I use that loosely because it was supposed to be a craft show but was mostly an MLM show. Sigh.

Then I went home and got sick. Read the rest of this entry »

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No rest for the wicked

July 20, 2018

No sleep for me this weekend either.

After doing the back-to-back shows of Salt Lake Gaming Con and Wizard World Boise, this weekend, my son is dragging me (most possibly literally) out for a 12 mile bike race/ride. At least he didn’t sign us up for the 100 miles — that may have awarded him with a smack upside the head. **grin**

I’m quite comfortable doing 7-9 miles, so I hope that 12 will be fine as long as I don’t get ahead of myself and try to push myself through the heat. I’m hoping that the day doesn’t get hot too fast.

Adrian can’t tell me how we return: “Maybe they will have a shuttle for the weak and the elderly. Which category do you fall into?” he asks with a huge grin. I return by sticking my tongue out at him. Yes, we have a real mature household here.

He’s been wanting to get me into cycle racing since before he got me a shiny new road bike to replace my mountain bike. Doesn’t he know that I’m dangerous with speed? The slowness of the mountain bike was to handicap my inner daredevil, not that I could be stopped from jumping off curbs and making mad dashes through mud puddles and such. Yeah, there are just some things a 40+ year old woman should not be doing.

Me with my bike.

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Hmmm, I wonder if that’s a severely limiting belief.

Then I recall the gaggle of junior high girls that weren’t paying attention when they were skating and we all tangled. I ended up on the floor, looking up into several scared sets of young eyes, and thinking that I had to get up off the floor before they started thinking that they had killed the old lady.

Yeah, really hoping this bike race doesn’t end up like that.

At any rate, I figure between the exertion and the heat, I am going to be one tuckered little cyclist by the time I get home. Pretty sure nothing will get done after that.

Maybe Sunday I can get back on schedule.

Until Adrian announces that he wants to go work out at the gym and drags me there for 3 hours (no joke).

Now do you see why I like to go dimension hopping? Time to slip through the page to another world again.

Have a great weekend. Send me good thoughts to get through the day, would you? Thanks!


The Art of Making Hay – Baling

May 11, 2015

I never got to drive the baler. Bummer.

It was hooked up to a tractor which my dad didn’t think a girl could drive. In this case, he was probably right. So, I never got to drive that tractor. Which means, I never actually baled hay. But I did get to watch plenty of men fight with the cursed machine.

Maniacal laughter here!

Since I could do the baling, I was most likely doing this -- riding my bike. And, take a good look at my jazzy jacket -- dang, I loved that outfit!

Since I could do the baling, I was most likely doing this — riding my bike. And, take a good look at my jazzy jacket — dang, I loved that outfit!

Once again, you work the fields section by section and pick up all the raked hay. The tines of the baler pick up the hay and it goes inside the machine where it is mashed, compressed, and tied. Out of the back fall these cute little rectangular bricks of hay.

Yep, editing is like that.

I’ve often said that you have to puke out the first draft. Just get it down on paper. You can’t work with anything if you don’t first have it written. Once it is, then you start to tighten up your plot, characters, themes, and words. You compress them, distill them down until only what is necessary remains. It’s monstrous work. Unlike baling, you actually get to rethink your writing and can go back to the drawing board if you need to. I take that back. I do remember when my dad got a moisture meter and we went around the field testing several bales. If the moisture was too high, we cut the wire and spread the hay back out to dry and he’d try baling it again in a day or two. Wow, that was almost a memory gone!

Editing is like that too. You have to keep your machinery in good working order, namely your brain. It’s got to remember what happened before and in what order. Chapter by chapter, you will get each one kicked out behind you until you have a whole book.

And, for goodness sake’s, don’t get your arm caught inside the machine.